Reviews

Successful long-term weight loss is 10% knowing the right facts and 90% having the right state of mind.  Even the best diet in the world will ultimately fall short, without the ability to look deeply within, set goals consistent with our greatest good, and live consciously. Zen Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh and Dr. Lilian Cheung, in Savor, have brought us a profoundly beautiful and powerful guide to mindful eating and living. I plan to savor this book regularly, and recommend it to everyone who eats. 

— David S. Ludwig, M.D., Ph.D.
Director of the Optimal Weight for Life (OWL) Program, Children’s Hospital Boston and author, Ending the Food Fight: Guide your Child to a Healthy Weight in a Fast Food/Fake Food World.

As a primary care physician, many of the patients I care for are struggling with their weight and have poor nutrition.  Taking the time to savor food and eat mindfully is often low on patients' agendas.  SAVOR provides a toolkit (to help patients to overcome this hurdle,) and for health care professionals to guide their patients along the path towards improved health.  Beyond mindful eating, Hanh and Cheung provide the reader with a mindful living plan (to  develop and maintain general well-being.)  SAVOR is well-referenced and provides great resources for further study including books, community resources, websites.  I highly recommend SAVOR to lay public and professionals alike.

— Helen Delichatsios, MD, SM
Assistant Professor, Nutrition Educator, Primary Care Physician
Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital

This book is beautifully written, compassionate, and innovative, and is one of the most original and important advances to nutrition and weight control I have seen in years.

— Kelly D. Brownell, Ph.D.
Director
Rudd Center of Food Policy & Obesity, Yale University

With chapters like “Are you really savoring your apple? An apple meditation,” “Savor: Mindful Eating, Mindful Life” (HarperOne, 2010, $25.99 hardcover, 304 pp.) is not your average healthy-eating guide. A hybrid of Buddhism and nutrition, “Savor” blends the Vietnamese Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh’s teachings with research done by Dr. Lilian Cheung, the director of health promotion and communication at the Harvard School of Public Health’s Department of Nutrition. Divided into three sections, “A Buddhist Perspective on Weight Control,” “Mindful Action Plans,” and “Individual and Collective Effort,” the book introduces Buddhist ideology before delving into specific healthy living tools, including exercises for untying external (and internal) knots, a ten-week sample mindful-eating plan- even a breakdown of fats. ‘Savor’ may have us rethinking every bite, but maybe that’s just what we need.

Tricycle Magazine

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